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Published: Sat, July 21, 2018
Medical | By Garry George

Man Dies Of Bacterial Infection After Eating Oysters In Restaurant

Man Dies Of Bacterial Infection After Eating Oysters In Restaurant

The 71-year-old Sarasota man was said to have eaten the contaminated oysters on July 8 and died two days later, according to the Florida Department of Health.

Florida health officials say a man in Sarasota has died from a bacterial infection after eating a bad oyster.

Health officials say that the man's death was caused by a bacteria known as Vibrio vulnificus, which is commonly found in oysters and other types of seafood.

Last year, Manatee County had two cases of flesh eating bacteria and Sarasota County had none.

Vibrio vulnificus is a bacterium that lives in warm, brackish seawater, according to the department of health.

In these instances, many people with the infections have to be admitted into ICU, with between 15 and 30 percent of cases proving to be fatal.

Through this oyster, he contracted a gastrointestinal illness related to a flesh-eating bacteria on the oyster. The Florida Department of Health said if you are infected, you could see these signs.

The best method of prevention is to simply avoid eating oysters raw.

These bacteria thrive in brackish water - water that's salty, but not quite at seawater levels, which is where oysters are often harvested from.

"Vibriosis causes an estimated 80,000 illnesses and 100 deaths in the United States every year", according to the Centers for Disease Control. "Have them cooked. Have them fried, have them boiled", Dr. Fred Lopez, with the Department of Internal Medicine at the LSU School of Medicine, told CBS affiliate WWL-TV. Most cases are unpleasant but resolve within a few days, but infections from the species Vibrio vulnificus cause a "flesh-eating" or necrotizing fasciitis condition that kills up to 30% of those infected.

Severe illness involving Vibrio vulnificus is rare, but it can require intensive care treatment or limb amputation.

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