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Published: Thu, June 07, 2018
Research | By Jennifer Evans

Pre-Flown SpaceX Rocket Introduces the Commercial Communications Satellite

Pre-Flown SpaceX Rocket Introduces the Commercial Communications Satellite

SES-12, a communication satellite today roared into space from Cape Canavera on-board SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket. Rough Cut (no reporter narration).

The Article from SpaceX Postpones Launch of SES-12 satellite. The company intends to fly a handful more of its used Block 4 versions of the Falcon 9 rocket before fully transitioning to the Block 5 version later this summer or early fall.

"The launch vehicle is expendable", said Martin Halliwell, chief technical officer for SES.

"Airbus salutes SES's ambitions regarding innovation and responsiveness in a rapidly changing market and we acknowledge their strong support for all-electric satellite technology", said Nicolas Chamussy, Head of Space Systems. It's such a powerful upper stage.

Industry projections show a five-fold increase in aircraft use of broadband services over the next five years, a doubling of maritime users and up to a million or more additional "connected enterprises". There are also some concerns about the Falcon Heavy rocket, which hasn't been under as much testing as the Falcon 9 rocket. Americans to deliver cargo to the global space station using the Cygnus vehicles Orbital ATK and Dragon manufactured by SpaceX. The 4 hours launch window was opened at near about 12:29 a.m. ET.

SpaceX won't land the booster again.

The rocket was initially scheduled to blast off on May 10, but the firm was forced to delay the maiden voyage after the rocket threw the abort signal 58 seconds before launch. "We are going to be very rigorous in taking this rocket apart and confirming our design assumptions to be confident that is indeed able to be reused without taking apart", Musk said last month. According to the reports, the second stage of Falcon 9 rocket would deploy the communication satellite after around thirty-two minutes and fourteen seconds of the liftoff.

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