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Published: Sun, June 24, 2018
Tech | By Dwayne Harmon

Apple announces new warranty program for faulty MacBook and MacBook Pro keyboards

Apple announces new warranty program for faulty MacBook and MacBook Pro keyboards

It wasn't long after Apple changed the mechanisms of its MacBook keyboards that reports of sticky keys and other problems surfaced. Luckily Apple fixed the space bar free of charge but fast forward to my now 2017 MacBook Pro and I'm finding occasional issues with the "E", "U", "B", and "C" key often sticking or feeling different.

The cost of out of warranty fix can be as high as $700, as keys can often not be repaired singly. The list for India includes, MacBook (Retina, 12-inch, Early 2015), MacBook (Retina, 12-inch, Early 2016), MacBook (Retina, 12-inch, 2017), MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2016, Two Thunderbolt 3 Ports), MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2017, Two Thunderbolt 3 Ports), MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2016, Four Thunderbolt 3 Ports), MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2017, Four Thunderbolt 3 Ports), MacBook Pro (15-inch, 2016), and MacBook Pro (15-inch, 2017). The models affected will be covered for four years from time of purchase. The so-called "butterfly" keys allowed for a much lower-profile keyboard with reduced travel distance when pressed. Well, in 2015 Apple switched to thin "Butterfly" switches for the both MacBook and Macbook Pro lines of laptops. If you already paid for those repairs, Apple is issuing refunds. Apple past year even posted a support page detailing how users can use compressed air to clean out the keyboard themselves, however, that reportedly doesn't always work, with the issue returning. Apple has acknowledged that a "small percentage of keyboards in certain MacBook and MacBook Pro models" may have the sticky keyboard problem that users have been complaining about.

And, please, continue keeping the issue quiet so that Apple can keep receiving its industry-best brand reliability award from Consumer Reports, whose scores are based exclusively on owner feedback.

The Outline was one of the first sites to identify the scope of the problem. "Service may involve the replacement of one or more keys or the whole keyboard". That has to take place at an Apple Store or authorized service provider, too, which means owners have been left without their computer for periods of time.

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