Latest
Recommended
Published: Fri, May 18, 2018
Culture | By Antonia Gonzales

Prime Perks: Amazon Dangles Discounts For Whole Foods Shoppers

Prime Perks: Amazon Dangles Discounts For Whole Foods Shoppers

The new Prime discounts should drive even more traffic to stores, and Whole Foods will bank on customers buying not just sale items, but plenty of full-price items, too.

On top of the discount on sale items that Amazon is offering, Prime members will apparently be entitled to other deals when shopping at Whole Foods, TechCrunch reports. Experts say Amazon's latest move to reduce prices at Whole Foods for Prime shoppers is its most aggressive effort to integrate the two companies to date. And we've already established that each new Amazon Prime member spends an average of $1,300 yearly at Amazon.com, further boosting revenue and AMZN stock.

Already, local Whole Foods shoppers can receive 5 percent cash back on purchases with the Amazon Prime Rewards Visa card. They will also get different bargains on items marked by blue signs in Whole Foods stores.

Higher sales for Whole Foods and more Prime Memberships would both be wins for AMZN stock.

The grocery store, which Amazon acquired for $13.7 billion previous year, is offering the discounts now in its Florida stores, and will expand nationwide this summer.

The Seattle-based Internet behemoth, which acquired the grocery chain in August for $13.7 billion, has been lowering prices on organic foods and giving Prime members special coupons to save at the store as it continues to integrate the companies.

For 39 years, Whole Foods Market has been the world's leading natural and organic foods retailer. This will add to Amazon's grocery business, and it also may help add to its 100 million Prime business.

As Jeff Bezos wrote in his 2016 letter to shareholders, "We want Prime to be such a good value, you'd be irresponsible not to be a member".

Prime savings at Whole Foods signal Amazon's biggest attempt yet at synergy between the two brands. If you shop at Whole Foods, that definitely seems to be the case.

Like this: