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Published: Wed, January 17, 2018
Global Media | By Abel Hampton

Lilibet writes . . . a young princess's notes preparing her for coronation

Lilibet writes . . . a young princess's notes preparing her for coronation

BBC handout photo from the documentary The Coronation, of Queen Elizabeth II with St Edward's Crown.

"It's the sort of, I suppose, the beginning of one's life really as a sovereign", she said.

Despite the country being in the grip of post-war austerity, a glittering coronation was staged on June 2 the following year at Westminster Abbey.

Told that two of the bishop who assisted her onto a platform after the moment of coronation were theoretically there to take the weight of the crown, she replies: "Really?"

The Queen may enjoy the great privilege of wearing a crown, but the extravagant headpiece doesn't come without its downside. That is the crown she wears at formal occasions such as the opening of Parliament, when she gives her speech outlining the government's legislative plans.

The crown was made for George VI's coronation in 1937 and is set with 2,868 diamonds including 17 sapphires, 11 emeralds and hundreds of pearls, including four known as Queen Elizabeth I's earrings.

The details of the story was later revealed to her by the royal commentator Alastair Bruce.

Lilibet writes . . . a young princess's notes preparing her for coronation
Lilibet writes . . . a young princess's notes preparing her for coronation

A trap door used to access the secret area where the tin box was kept still exists today.

Never before has the queen publicly spoken about her 1953 coronation-nor has she ever seen footage of herself, Smithsonian Channel says. "The arches and beams at the top were covered with a sort of haze of wonder as Papa was crowned, at least I thought so".

"I remember my father making me write down what I remembered about his coronation". I mean it's only sprung on leather.

Other memories The Queen brought up is the "horrible" experience of riding in the Gold State Coach. She said, "So there are some disadvantages to crowns, but otherwise they're quite important things".

"This is what I do when I wear it!", she said, grabbing the crown and spinning it around to show off her favourite jewel. "When you put it on it stays, it just remains itself".

And on her journey on the golden carriage that took her from Buckingham Palace to Westminster Abbey? She admits that one, too, is "uncomfortable". But since that's one of the many things the queen will certainly never discuss on television, we will for now just enjoy her thoughts on the world's most elaborate and memorable coronation ceremony. Referring to the press attention they received, particularly at the dress rehearsals, she added: "We were kind of like the Spice Girls". "It's so heavy", she said. To prevent this, the maids of honour tucked smelling salts into their gloves.

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