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Published: Fri, January 12, 2018
Research | By Jennifer Evans

Google makes little noise buying United Kingdom sound tech startup Redux

Google makes little noise buying United Kingdom sound tech startup Redux

The startup called Redux developed the technology called Panel Audio that allowed the panels or screens to produce audio without needing any speakers.

A United Kingdom regulatory filing from December 2017 showed that Google subsidiary Google Ireland Holdings Unlimited Company, bought all the shares of NVF Tech, the parent company of Redux Laboratories.

While no one was paying attention at the end of 2017, Google swooped in and purchased a company in the United Kingdom called Redux that has a couple of pretty unique ideas around display panels. However, it is believed the deal went through in August. Redux could help develop the sound for their new models. So not only can the company's tech turn a flat surface like the screen of a phone into a pair of speakers, but it can also be used to provide focused haptic feedback-for instance, to make certain parts of the screen "feel" different. The sound quality is said to be "decent".

The startup was backed by investors including Arie Capital and it had 178 granted patents according to its Linkedin page. It's speculative, but it could be that Google plans on heating things up in the continued 2018 bezel race with some in-screen speakers on the next Pixel (s), or maybe it plans on using the company's improved haptics for a Taptic-like experience.

So far, Redux has only been able to use its technologies inside PCs and some auto infotainment systems - but that could be about to change.

Apple's Taptic Engine has not been recreated in a mainstream Android phone so far, but this technology could be Google's key to doing exactly this.

Google Pixel 2 and Pixel 2 XL smartphones both feature dual front-facing speakers, which has been welcomed by many critics and users.

Google (GOOG, GOOGL) acquired a United Kingdom speaker tech startup late past year for undisclosed terms.

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