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Published: Wed, December 13, 2017
Research | By Jennifer Evans

NASA's Kepler space telescope makes discovery using machine learning from Google

NASA's Kepler space telescope makes discovery using machine learning from Google

The Kepler telescope was launched in 2009 and has since found thousands of planets outside the solar system, Newsweek reports. Also, 30 planets are present in habitable zones, which means that their distance from the neighboring stars, and the stars that they orbit allows them to support extraterrestrial life. Officials added that the Google tech was being used by researchers as a new way of analyzing data coming back to Earth from Kepler.

The teleconference will be streamed on Thursday, December 14 at 1pm.

After finishing its main mission in 2012, Kepler kept going for another year, collecting data until 2014, when the K2 mission began. The mission was successful as it confirmed that there are 2,337 exoplanets that exist, and moreover, 4,496 more possible candidates.

Named in honor of German astronomer Johannes Kepler, the Kepler Mission is created to discover Earth-like planets orbiting other stars. Citizen scientists using the Planet Hunters program were studying dips in light of stars discovered by Kepler when they noticed peculiar dips from a star named KIC 8462852. Later that year, NASA said the "unexplained and freakish behavior" was likely a swarm of comets passing in front of the star.

NASA's Kepler space telescope makes discovery using machine learning from Google
NASA's Kepler space telescope makes discovery using machine learning from Google

Nasa said that four engineers and scientists would take part in the press conference, including Paul Hertz, who leads Nasa's astrophysics division, a senior Google software engineer, and two scientists.

Set your alarm clocks - at 2am on Friday morning NASA is announcing something big - the latest discovery made by its Kepler space telescope, which is searching for "other Earths" using machine learning from Google.

Google Brain is responsible for research which helps robots pick up sand and teaches machines to be fair.

Exactly what this new method of combing has revealed, we will have to wait until Thursday to see.

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