Latest
Recommended
Published: Wed, October 04, 2017
Medical | By Garry George

Hammond throws down gauntlet to Corbyn and says 'bring it on'

Hammond throws down gauntlet to Corbyn and says 'bring it on'

In a surprisingly forthright attack the CBI said Mr Hammond's speech to the Conservative party conference left business with "slim pickings" and did not face up to the magnitude of the "generation-defining" challenge of leaving the European Union.

For Labour, Shadow Chancellor John McDonnell said: "After seven wasted years of Tory economic failure. he is continuing down the path of his predecessor and clinging to an old economic model that fails the many".

Asked whether Mr. Johnson should be sacked, the chancellor told ITV's Good Morning Britain: "We all serve at the prime minister's pleasure and we all owe the prime minister our allegiance and our loyalty within the cabinet".

Theresa May has insisted Jeremy Corbyn' is "unfit to govern" and pledged to listen to younger voters following the results of June's election that saw the Conservative lose their majority.

Hammond insisted the British economy was "fundamentally strong", with employment at a record high and income inequality at its lowest level for decades.

But he acknowledged the damage inflicted by the tortuous process of Brexit. "But it betrays how fearful the Tories are of the challenge posed by Jeremy Corbyn". "Removing the uncertainty is, I think, the best incentive we can provide to business".

Mr. Johnson also demanded the United Kingdom refuse to accept new EU or European Court of Justice rulings during the transition and does not make payments for Single Market access when transition ends.

"We will have to be prepared to support the economy as necessary throughout this period".

'They look to us in terms of what they want to see'. We will take them on.

He said Britain must not downplay the difficulties nor underestimate the complexities, saying Brexit will be one of the most challenging tasks ever undertaken by a peacetime government.

"Elsewhere in the article, Healey says the additional controls - which at this stage would appear to be proposed just for cities rather than the whole country - would be allowing "increases in rents to be moderated" in urban areas" where housing cost pressures are most acute".

"For some, it will feel like driving with your foot to the floor, but the handbrake half on". A further 100 million pounds will be committed for 33 new road projects in the north of England. What was evident was that only the Conservative Party has the most to offer young people to get on in life.

Like this: