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Published: Mon, September 11, 2017
Culture | By Antonia Gonzales

Nuclear plants in Hurricane Irma's path are shutting down

Nuclear plants in Hurricane Irma's path are shutting down

Florida Power & Light says it will be weeks, not days, before electricity is fully restored because of the damage being done by Hurricane Irma.

FPL is the biggest power company in Florida serving nearly half of the state's 20.6 million residents.

About 574,000 of those outages were in Miami-Dade County, while there were 360,000 in Broward and almost 136,000 in Palm Beach County.

But no grid is hurricane-proof, and if Irma stays on its path, many FPL customers will lose power, Gould said.

The company said that isn't the case and that it plans to continue providing power before, during and after the storm.

Duke Energy Corp., the state's second-largest utility, has estimated it could see more than 1 million outages because of Irma. Scott said Saturday night that the outages expected to grow as Irma moves closer to the state. "A storm of this magnitude an intensity will require us in many cases to completely rebuild out electric system from the ground up, particularly on the west coast".

FPL said it now has 16,000 crews from around the country - from California, Massachusetts Texas, Colorado and Wisconsin, including its own to restore power once hurricane and tropical winds subside.

The very big storm covers an area more than double the size of the state, and on Sunday had maximum sustained winds of 130 miles an hour.

48 hours after landfall, county by county estimates are given and finally 96 hours after landfall they provide restoration estimate at a more local level.

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