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Published: Sat, September 09, 2017
Research | By Jennifer Evans

Northern Lights Friday Night

Northern Lights Friday Night

Local folk could get the chance to see the Northern Lights this evening.

People from northeast Montana, North Dakota, northeast South Dakota, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, New York, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Vermont, and ME will be able to see it right in front of their eyes from their own houses. Complicating an ideal viewing experience will be Wednesday's full moon.

Canada traditionally sits at a comfortable latitude for observing the Northern Lights, and meteorologists are confident that an Aurora Borealis will make its presence known.

The dancing rays and arcs of the Aurora Borealis occur when electrons collide with the outermost edges of the atmosphere.

And while Space.com called the back-to-back flares notable, they are "by no means extreme", Terry Onsager, a physicist at the NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center, said. That's not always a good thing, since plasma and other particles from the sun-collectively called space weather-can interfere with our Global Positioning System and communications satellites.

The Northern Lights are a phenomenon caused by the interaction of high-energy particles and neutral atoms in Earth's atmosphere - causing breathtaking spectacles in the night sky. In fact, those areas can catch an aurora about once every two nights. They mostly appear in areas like Alaska, Greenland, Scandinavia, the northern half of Russian Federation, and the outer fringes of Antarctica.

"Then in the early morning the auroral forms can take on a more cloud-like appearance".

Auroras can most commonly be spotted between 60 and 75 degrees north or south of the equator-that's places like Alaska, the southern half of Greenland, Scandinavia, the northern half of Russian Federation, and the outer fringes of Antarctica.

The solar storm will however bring with it some more notable auroras.

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