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Published: Fri, September 08, 2017
Global Media | By Abel Hampton

Graham backs Trump ending DACA with 6-month delay

Graham backs Trump ending DACA with 6-month delay

President Donald Trump reportedly has chose to give DACA, Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, a six-month reprieve before abolishing the Obama-era program that temporarily shields from deportation qualified immigrants brought to the U.S.as children.

The Republican governor told reporters Tuesday it's Congress' job to pass immigration law.

"I'm here today to announce that the program known as a DACA that was brought under the Obama imitation is being rescinded", Sessions said on Tuesday.

"As attorney general, it is my duty to see that the laws of the United States are enforced", Sessions said in his announcement. "This is a temporary stopgap measure that lets us focus our resources wisely while giving a degree of relief and hope to talented, driven, patriotic young people".

The Department of Homeland Security will immediately stop accepting applications to the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program - but current recipients would not be affected until March 5 of next year. Attorney General Jeff Sessions gave Congress six months to act before anyone loses the ability to live in the United States.

Sessions said the administration will begin the wind-down process of the program. The administration, however, says that DACA is unconstitutional, and it is looking to Congress to create a solution to addresses the status of DACA workers, as well as broader immigration reforms. If DACA is given another six months, Congress could take up the issue.

No sour grapes there from Bradshaw, a top adviser to Jeb Bush, who was expected to waltz into the 2016 Republican presidential nomination - until Trump said otherwise.

One of the citable notes from Obama's last news conference as President emphasized the DACA program.

"Wells Fargo believes young, undocumented immigrants brought to America as children should have the opportunity to stay", spokeswoman Jennifer Dunn wrote in an email. "It's just that simple".

Immigrants to be deported?

The Kentucky senator added that "there are ways" to protect the deportation of undocumented immigrants who were brought to the country as minors and sought work permits. Trump has waffled back-and-forth on whether he would continue the program as a candidate and then as president. "We should never be a country that kicks out some of our best and brightest students".

Others, like South Carolina Republican Sen.

That said, Trump's base will likely be far from happy about the president's decision to leave open the option of a legislative fix.

Trump has spent months wrestling with what to do with DACA, which he slammed during his campaign as illegal "amnesty".

American business leaders also objected to Trump's immigration moves.

"No president has authority to keep the promises the Obama administration made to the Dreamers", Schmidt said. I stand with them. "They deserve our respect as equals and a solution rooted in American values".

"When I look at each young person that teeters on the edge of this living nightmare of only getting crumbs in return for a life well-lived, I can not tolerate it".

One of the co-authors of the autopsy, Sally Bradshaw, who left the Republican Party after Trump's election, says party leaders who have "enabled" the president "deserve the reckoning that will eventually come for the GOP".

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