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Published: Sun, April 09, 2017
Economy | By Melissa Porter

Judge To Decide If State Should Help With Pipe Replacement in Flint

Judge To Decide If State Should Help With Pipe Replacement in Flint

Within three years, authorities must examine water service lines for at least 18,000 households and replace those made of lead and galvanized steel. Instead, if the deal is approved, Flint residents will be able to call the city's 211 number and order free water for delivery within 24 hours.

The state has also agreed to set aside an additional US$10 million for unexpected extra expenses.

The proposed timeline looks to replace lines in at least 6,000 households by 2018, 12,000 by the following year and the remaining 6,000 in 2020.

The settlement stemmed from a lawsuit filed previous year by a coalition of religious, environmental and civil rights activists that alleged Flint water was not safe to drink because state and city officials were violating the Safe Drinking Water Act.

"We have oversight. We get to be there every step of the way", Mays said, adding: "Until I get that "all clear" in my house, that trust won't be built until the pipes are out of the ground".

DETROIT (AP) — Michigan and the city of Flint agreed Monday to replace thousands of home water lines under a sweeping deal to settle a lawsuit by residents over lead-contaminated water in the struggling community.

The settlement will be presented to a federal judge in Detroit on Tuesday for approval.

Michigan Radio's Wells noted this is one of several major lawsuits over Flint's tainted water.

The National Guard began distributing bottled water and filters in Flint more than a year ago.

Michael J. Steinberg, legal director, American Civil Liberties Union of Michigan: "We are thrilled that, after almost three years of grappling with lead-poisoned water, the residents of Flint can finally look forward to a long-term solution to a catastrophe that has devastated the community".

Problems started in Flint in 2014 when they switched to the Flint River as a water source, in an effort to cut costs.

"We are thrilled that, after almost three years of grappling with lead-poisoned water, the residents of Flint can finally look forward to a long-term solution to a catastrophe that has devastated the community", said Michael J. Steinberg, Legal Director of the ACLU of MI.

In February, city officials announced the state would stop paying for Flint's drinking water and end water credits for customers beginning March 1.

After the switch, Flint's water supply was contaminated by lead, causing the water to take on a murky brown color. "The people of Flint are owed at least this much", Dimple Chaudhary, an attorney for NRDC, said in a statement.

In the meantime, Flint's nine Community Water Resources Sites will still be open to distribute bottled water and free filters, filter cartridges, and water testing kits. In 2016, the city was under a declaration of emergency from the state.

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