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Published: Mon, March 20, 2017
Global Media | By Abel Hampton

Trump Trashes 'Fake Media' For Falsely Reporting On American Health Care Act

Trump Trashes 'Fake Media' For Falsely Reporting On American Health Care Act

Despite the tweaks Ryan said the bill needs, he added that he feels "very good" about the legislation's progress and where things now stand. "Every single person sitting in this room is now a yes", the president said as he met with members of the Republican Study Committee, most of whom already supported the bill.

Price said the administration plans to test and then keep the bill provisions that benefit patients and drive down insurance costs. "There's no doubt about it", Price responded, acknowledging changes made to the bill to win over conservatives could scare off moderate Republicans.

While Mr. Rubio has said he is open to the bill that Mr. Ryan and Mr. Trump have crafted, Mr. Cruz, Mr. Here is the central prize: "If we lower premiums, and hopefully lower them a lot, that is a victory for the American people".

Trump was upbeat about the bill's prospects for passage during a joint press conference on Friday afternoon at the White House with German Chancellor Angela Merkel.

Rep. Brian Fitzpatrick (R-Pa.), who represents a suburban Philadelphia district that has been heavily targeted by Democrats, said in a Facebook post that he was most concerned that the legislation would roll back efforts to prevent and treat opioid abuse.

Their leader on the issues, House Speaker Paul Ryan, may be trying to deliver a slick rollout of a new health care plan, but Ryan's own small government philosophy is getting in his way. Reps. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (R-Fla.) and Leonard Lance (R-N.J.) have cited that concern in announcing their opposition to the bill, and several other moderates remain undecided.

No wonder House Republicans started voting on their health care plan to replace Obamacare without this information provided by the nonpartisan and neutral Congressional Budget Office.

Meadows, a North Carolina Republican, told C-Span's "Newsmakers" the changes being considered for the Medicaid program would not go far enough, if they left it up to states to decide whether to put in place a work requirement.

Still, Trump suggested that he won't accept a legislation that hurts Americans as much as the AHCA, even if it means he could move on to other parts of his agenda. But he acknowledged that the GOP bill would probably have to change.

Speaking on "Fox News Sunday", Ryan said he believes the CBO analysis is not accurate but agreed that people in their 50s and 60s experience higher health care costs.

Senator Tom Cotton, a conservative Arkansas Republican, said that the bill would not reduce premiums for people on the private insurance market. That, according to the CBO estimate, leads to substantial cost savings that - together with cuts to Medicaid - allow the GOP plan to eliminate almost all of the taxes imposed under the ACA.

Instead, he pushed for a clean repeal of ObamaCare.

Paul added that the House GOP plan doesn't "fix the fundamental problem of Obamacare", which he said are the mandates on insurance companies.

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