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Published: Tue, January 31, 2017
Economy | By Melissa Porter

Small group protests Bank of America's funding of Dakota Access Pipeline

Small group protests Bank of America's funding of Dakota Access Pipeline

"We can't afford for our fresh water to be compromised in any way".

He added civic organisation, Unite Colorado Springs, had been standing with the people of Standing Rock Indian Reservation in North and South Dakota since September, adding that they were determined to protest Trump's executive actions as long as he was president.

"This move is legally questionable, at best".

"To introduce rule of law within the camp, we will be asking the Trump administration for much-needed law enforcement support and public safety resources, requests that were ignored by the last administration", the sheriff's department recently wrote on Facebook. He invited TransCanada to re-submit its application that was blocked in 2015 by then-President Obama, who said the project would contribute to global warming. About 1 million barrels a day are now produced in North Dakota.

"Trump is a direct threat to the environment, and his decision to renew these pipelines is solid evidence of that", said L.L. Gaddy, a University of SC student and co-founder of 350 Columbia.

The Keystone XL pipeline would carry tar sands from Canada to US refineries on the Gulf Coast.

Shares of ETP, the company building the 450,000 barrel-a-day Dakota pipeline, ended the day up 3.5 percent in US trading. The bank is among the 35 institutions funding or overseeing the construction of the pipeline. Marinelli said senior Army Corps officials were meeting on Monday to discuss how to follow that order. Tuesday's White House memoranda said the Army and the Army Corps of Engineers should review and quickly approve permits for Dakota Access.

Ryan Barry, who organised the protest, said he wanted to raise awareness about a movement toward sustainable energy, not fossil fuel. "We are going to continue to show up at your home, Donald Trump".

The pipeline is planned to run under the Missouri River, which is the tribe's main drinking source, and will travel through sacred burial ground.

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